Sunday, March 9, 2014

Timeless Trench Part 1: Muslin and Fit


I decided to separate the trench coat into sections and tackle some fun quick projects in between because I tend to get bored with big projects then sometimes do not finish them. I will post weekly on my progress and if all goes well the coat will be completed on time at the end of the month for my The Monthly Stitch challenge.
After checking the measurements for the sizes, I decided I should make a quick muslin to be sure the fit through the shoulders and arms would be right.
I am exactly in between the size 10 and size 12 pattern measurements. I cut the size 12,going with the bust and size, guessing that I will probably grade to a size 10 in several areas especially the shoulders.

The pattern uses shoulder pads, so I stuck one in on one side to see if that made any changes in the fit.


I do like the shoulder pad, I have small shoulders and this fills out the shoulder space more but, not quite enough. I will do the size 10 in this area.

I am trying to decide if I want to grade the entire coat down to a size 10 because the size 12 is extra roomy.


 This pattern comes with many options. I decided to go with the classic version E.
The only design changes I have decided to make are to the pockets. I prefer generous pockets in the side seams of my coats.  The pattern shows the pockets on the front, I am not sure how functional that will be for me. I used the pocket pattern piece to check for placement and size.


I like a roomy functional pocket and the size of the pocket is small, too small for my hands. I will draft these larger. I am glad I sewed a muslin before I cut into my expensive fabric.
What do you think, should I go with the size 10?

Next week Part 2: Assembly of the front and back along with top stitching, pockets and side seams.

8 comments:

  1. What are you likely to wear under the coat? The bust area fits you well but I would try to grade the rest down to a size 10. How did you find the construction? I really like that shiny coat on the pattern front but not sure if I am skilled enough yet :) think I will add this pattern to my TO DO sewing list for the future. Helen -x- from: http://helloushandmades.blogspot.co.uk/

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    1. Thank you! That is what I was wondering about with the size. The construction looks simple with lots of topstitching and extra details.

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  2. I would definitely make those pockets deeper. What was McCall's thinking with those tiny, useless pockets? And I would add an inside pocket too. I like things like that - a secret pocket so to speak. And I agree with the commenter before me - Helen Gibbons- don't grade the whole coat down to a size ten. It is a coat after all and you need the room in case you decide to wear a heavy sweater under it. I have this pattern, so I will be watchful of your finished product. The muslin looks really nice, I like the collar a lot.

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    1. I like the idea of a secret pocket. I will have to add one of those in.

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  3. Are you wearing what you'll normally wear underneath the trench? If you are, I think you should go down a size because there's excess fabric in the back and the front. I think it's a good start to your trench though! Ahh, I feel like I should make a jacket/trench/coat sometime too. :)

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    1. Thanks for the advice. I feel like it is a bit roomy for me but will try it on again with a sweater to be sure.

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  4. Be careful with grading down coats, as you'll probably want a few layers underneath (if it's for winter!). I love your pocket idea! Can't wait to see this made up :)

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  5. The bottom looks good as is, for the top half I would try and make a size 10 muslin as well, because I think you have a lot of room on the back, and it looks a bit saggy. But try on the muslin with the clothes you are going to wear underneath (winter or summer or in between?) and if you decide to add a thicker lining, maybe put on an extra layer while trying on the muslin...
    And as for the pockets, you are absolutely right, a trench needs good decent pockets!

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